Is Cafe In France Raking It In By Charging Rude Customers More?

The Local reports that a cafe in Nice, France, charges extra for “rudeness.”

Specifically the cafe has a menu board with the following rates (as translated from French):

  • “A coffee” – 7 Euros
  • “A coffee, please” – 4.25 Euros
  • “Hello, a coffee, please” – 1.4 Euros

3 Questions That Arise From This Story

1. If you really need a coffee, because you’re half-asleep are you going to read the menu board? If we’ve learned anything about politeness from traveling through France, it seems that many people are going to be paying seven Euros for that first coffee!

2. Is there a secret menu for when Samuel L. Jackson comes in and says “Hello, I’d like, a M*thaf****n’ coffee, please!” While at first it may seem tricky as to whether that would result in a 1.4 Euro coffee, upon further reflection, if we learned one thing from grade school French class, the barista/teacher will say “En Français!” and charge 7 Euros and give Mr. Jackson a detention for swearing.

3. Is this much talking to get a coffee more or less fun than the amount of talking required to get a coffee at Starbucks? Between trying to remember sizes that you still don’t understand, and ultimately deciding that “Grande” sounds big, and giving your name to a stranger to write on the cup, this may seem to be a tough comparison. Especially in France, where in this cafe, or Starbucks, mimes are gonna have a tough time. How do you mime “Venti?” And we’re pretty sure “pointing” is ruder than just saying “coffee.” With all these negative options, there’s a reason mimes pretend their trapped in a box all day.

Bonjour la France, et bienvenue à Not The Worst News!

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Categories: Business, Humor

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

2 replies

  1. Perhaps they could expand the rules to the staff as well. Take money off for eye-rolling, correcting pronunciation, etc.

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